Airing weekdays at 7:30 A.M. on

Airing weekdays at 7:30 A.M. on

On this episode of the Balancing Act, we’ve got a lot on the menu—literally and figuratively! From an education with purpose to cooking with celebrity chef Ingrid Hoffman, the show is packed with entertaining and informative content.

First off, we’re having an honest discussion about baby nutrition. Enter Similac, the country’s first and only infant formula made with human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs). A modern medical breakthrough, HMOs, which help support a baby’s growth and developing immune system, were once something a baby could only receive through his or her own mother’s breast milk. Now, all moms can avoid feeling stressed about not being able to or choosing not to breastfeed by opting for Similac!

Then, whether you’re going back to school or just starting your college years, it’s important to pick a university that aligns with both your educational and personal needs. Consider Barry University in Miami Shores, Fla., one of the largest Catholic universities in the Southeast.

Next, join host Olga Villaverde with celebrity chef Ingrid Hoffmann and her two junior chefs as they prepare a tropical chicken skewers recipe. The recipe calls for a tamarind-balsamic glaze, which is made using Star’s Extra Virgin Olive Oil and Balsamic Glaze.

Before we go, host Laura Saltman takes us inside the Lacuna Health Call Center, where registered nurses are on call 24 hours a day. Here, healthcare is only a phone call away! It’s designed for patients who are transitioning back to life inside their own homes, allowing them to better understand their care and ask further questions all within the comfort of their residence.

 

Health, Wealth, Beauty, and Business

Bringing the best tips from the experts in Atlanta in business, beauty, wealth management, child healthcare, car shopping, and more. Each year, Atlanta’s Women’s Entrepreneurship Initiative selects 15 local female entrepreneurs for a 15-month business training program. We meet women who have grown their companies, created jobs, and broke through the glass ceiling. With some […]

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