Airing weekdays at 7:30 A.M. on

Airing weekdays at 7:30 A.M. on

Sure, your dog is like a member of the family. But the truth is, between a full day of work, chores, extracurricular activities and spending time with the family, sometimes Fido drops to the bottom of your priority list.

Here are five ways to help ease your guilt and show your furry friend how much you love them:

  1. Field trip! Did someone say car ride? Long walks are great, but exploring somewhere new can be mentally stimulating for your dog, especially if they’ve been cooped up in the house all day. If the store is pet friendly, take them with you as you run errands. Or simply visit your local pet supply store and get them a special toy or treat.
  2. Playdate. Does your dog have a favorite canine buddy? Arrange some time at a park for the two to get together and burn off some energy together.
  3. Guest of honor. Give yourself a break from cooking and take your dog out to dinner! Choose a restaurant with an outdoor patio that accepts dogs, or pick up some finger foods and have a picnic in a nearby park.
  4. Old dog, new trick! Positive training increases your bond with your dog. Whether you take a class or work on foundation behaviors at home, training is great opportunity for quality time and teaches your pet to want to work with you.
  5. One-on-one time. If your dog is a snuggler, indulge them. If they aren’t allowed on the couch or bed, get down on their level – literally. Spending just 15 minutes showing them your undivided attention is invaluable.

SOURCE:
Modern Dog, Summer 2015

Behind the Mystery is a special segment dedicated to revolutionizing the way the health care system works for those suffering from a rare and genetic disorder.

Behind the Mystery takes a closer look at one of the two types of Polycystic Kidney disease. Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease, or ADPKD, is a rare, genetic condition.

Behind the Mystery takes a closer look at Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm, a rare disease that is often misdiagnosed and affects at least 500 to 1,000 patients each year in the U.S.